How to Craft a Compelling Elevator Pitch

IMG_4808

If you didn’t catch our last article on why you should create an elevator pitch, take a moment to be convinced! Read it here.

Now that you know how important it is to have your own, how do you actually go about crafting a good elevator pitch? 

Here’s what author/influencer Michael Hyatt has to say:

“First, understand that the pitch will be different depending on whether you are offering an information product (e.g., non-fiction book, speech, consulting service, etc.) or an entertainment product (e.g, novel, screenplay, comedy act, etc.). Note that when I use the term “product,” I am referring to your creative output regardless of the form. It could be an actual product, a service, or even a cause.

An elevator pitch for an information product should consist of four components:

  • Component 1: Your product name and category.
  • Component 2: The problem you are attempting to solve.
  • Component 3: Your proposed solution.
  • Component 4: The key benefit of your solution.

Here’s an example from my current project:

I am writing a new [Component 1] business book called Platform. [Component 2] It is designed for anyone who is trying to get attention for their product, service, or cause. [Component 3] I teach my readers how to build a tribe of loyal followers, using social media and other new technologies. [Component 4] I explain that it has never been easier, less expensive, or more possible than right now.”

An elevator pitch for an entertainment product should also consist of four components:

  • Component 1: Your product name and category.
  • Component 2: The main character’s ambition.
  • Component 3: The conflict he or she encounters.
  • Component 4: The real significance of the story.

Here’s an example from a mythical project about the modern composer, Eric Whitacre:

I am shooting an [Component 1] inspirational documentary called Cloudburst.[Component 2] It is about a young, extremely gifted musician who dreams of becoming a symphony conductor. [Component 3] The only problem is he can’t read music. As a result, no one in the music business will give him a chance. [Component 4] Yet he ultimately succeeds because of his honesty, optimism, and hard work.”

Obviously, pitches can vary widely, depending on your offering. Regardless, you want to create an elevator pitch that is clear and compelling. This is a prerequisite to attracting the partners and prospects you need to succeed.

Once you get your elevator pitch fine-tune, don’t deliver it like a mechanical parrot. Instead, do what Michael Port suggest in his excellent book, Book Yourself Solid, Chapter 4: use it as the foundation of a meaningful sales conversation.”

So what is your elevator pitch? We’d love to hear it!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s