If you gather a group of 10 writers, you will find that each of them has a different “toolbox” full of digital and not-so-digital writing tools that they can’t live without. Some like to do all their writing on their computer. Some use voice dictation, while others are still buying yellow legal pads and pens in bulk.

Beyond the physical tools of the trade, there are just as many online tools available to writers. But which are helpful and which just add to the noise and clutter of our digitally-dependent lives?

In our last post, we shared some of Jane Friedman’s favorite productivity tools, and we’ve gathered a few more here today that we hope will help, not hinder your writing process.

Freedom

When it comes to writing, what is your number one distraction? If you’re like most writers, you probably said the internet. How often have you seen an hour of your time get sucked into the black hole of Facebook? Or perhaps you’ve tried to write while your phone buzzes, beeps and chirps at you every 30 seconds. Even if you don’t stop to check it, your mind will struggle to stay in the zone of writing. That’s where Freedom comes in.  Freedom allows you to block certain notifications from certain apps at certain times. Don’t want to know about every Facebook comment or Twitter follow? Freedom can help. It can even be programmed to shut off notifications or the internet completely during certain times. Do you always write during your lunch break at work? Tell Freedom and it will automatically hang a digital “do not disturb” sign on your phone during that time every day, keeping you on track and efficient. Here’s a quick explanation of the app’s features:

 

There is a small monthly fee, but if you find writing distraction-free is really improving your efficiency, it might be worth the cost.

Grammarly

We can’t say enough about this amazing (and free!) browser extension. Grammarly integrates with most platforms to automatically check your grammar as you write. From WordPress to Google Documents, from Facebook to Gmail, Grammarly is the proverbial English teacher, hovering over your shoulder correcting your work as you go. Most of the features are free, but a premium membership is available, which offers a few extra tools, such as a plagarism checker.

 

Ulysses

Like Freedom, Ulysses helps to avoid distractions, but this app takes things a step further by consolidating all of your writing tasks into one place. Need to write distraction-free? Check. Need to keep all of your work and inspiration in one place, cataloged by project? Check. Need to easily export your work using various file types? No problem. So what’s the catch? Ulysses is only available for Apple devices and it costs $45.

In her recent article The Best Writing Apps of 2017, Jill Duffy of PC Mag wrote:

Writers who find themselves in the less-is-more camp will want a writing app that strips away anything that could possibly be the least little bit distracting. Distraction-free writing apps are a dime a dozen. The trick is to find one that also offers the tools you need when you need them. In other words, the best distraction-free writing app will hide the tools you need until the appropriate time, rather than omitting them altogether.

With that criterion in mind, Ulysses is my favorite distraction-free writing app, and a PCMag Editors’ Choice.

At Certa Publishing, we believe in equipping our authors with the practical tools you need to write your best. Through posts like this, as well as others about long-form writing, cultivating good writing habits, and writing the rough draft, we hope to provide you with everything you need to pour your heart and life onto the page.

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The Writer’s Digital Toolbox: Part 2

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