Social Media Influencers: How to find and utilize them

social media influencers

Pretend for a moment that you are a new mom trying to decide on a brand of baby wipes. You’ve seen plenty of advertisement by the various brands, but it’s something else that makes up your mind. Not a Huggies ad or a Target mailer. No, it’s an Instagram post by your friend with 7 children. She mentions that she has tried all brands of wipes and settled, surprisingly, on the Walmart store brand as her favorite. You’re sold! And for the next few years, Walmart reaps the benefit of that one, simple word-of-mouth recommendation.

Why did that work? Because even though no one would have called that mother of 7 a “social media influencer,” in that moment, she was. In the mind of her friend, her expertise and credibility in the niche market of baby products trumped anything a Pampers ad could say.

This is nothing new. However, what is new, is that businesses have realized the effectiveness of the “social media influencer” and are intentionally targeting them to provide this valuable word-of-mouth marketing for their products.

And writers should do the same! So, how does it work?

1. Find your social media influencers

If you’re writing a book, hopefully you have spent a good amount of time narrowing down just who your audience is. Perhaps your audience consists of pastors looking to hone their speaking skills, or cancer patients looking for hope, or parents looking for Gospel-centered picture books for their preschoolers.

The next step is to determine who that audience looks to as an “influencer.”

For example, those pastors likely look to other successful, high-profile pastors with fantastic speaking skills. And those cancer patients probably look to oncology experts and well-known cancer survivors. Christian parents of preschoolers may look to mommy bloggers and Christian publishers.

If you’re not sure where to begin in the search for your audience’s influencers, there are some great tools available, both paid and free.

Trendspottr is a tool that will help you spot trends on Instagram, whether it is trending influencers, hashtags or posts. You can use this tool to discover what your target audience is liking and following. For example, if you write about healthy eating, you can use Trendspottr to stay on top of trending diets and ingredients, but also to discover which Instagram accounts within this space are getting the most attention. These are your niche’s “influencers.”

Buzzsumo is a site designed exclusively for finding social media influencers. And once you find them, the site will help you follow them, reach out to them and engage with them.

Followerwonk is designed specifically for Twitter. It will help you discover, follow and organize your niche’s social media influencers on this important platform.

Speaking of Twitter, this site lists all of the Twitter Chats that happen throughout the week, which can be a great way to interact with influencers. For example, if your writing is about post-traumatic stress disorder, there is a Twitter Chat on this subject every Monday night at 8pm, hosted by two influencers in that field.

While these tools are helpful, don’t disregard more traditional forms of online research, such as Reddit, LinkedIn groups, and good, old-fashioned Google.

2. Reach out to influencers

Now that you have a list of influencers within your niche, it’s time to reach out. Here are a few methods:

Comment on their blog and social media posts: Become an active commenter by offering authentic compliments and helpful commentary on their posts. As you do this more and more, the influencer will become more familiar with you. Be sure not to push your own product in the comments. Be patient!

Meet in person: Keep tabs on when influencers might be coming into town. Will they be a speaker at a local conference or hosting a meetup nearby? This is the perfect chance to meet face to face and give them your card. Although it may be a quick interaction, meeting you makes it much more likely that they will respond to follow-up messages from you.

Mention them in your own work: Everyone loves to be quoted and mentioned on blogs and social media (as long as it’s positive!) Look for ways within your content writing to do so, in hopes that the person you mentioned will share what you wrote.

Retweet and share their social media posts: Each time a person’s social media post is shared, they get a notification. This is a great way to keep your name fresh in your influencer’s mind. And be sure to include relevant hashtags and mentions when you share.

Offer to be a guest writer: Most prolific bloggers are happy to turn the reins over to a quality writer for a day. In fact, many post their guest blogger submission requirements right on their blog. This is a great opportunity to get your face in front of the influencer’s audience.

Go ahead and ask: Once you’ve established a relationship with your influencer, it’s time to confidently ask them if they would mention your book or product to their audience. This could be as simple as them retweeting you, or as elaborate as them reading a quote from your book on their podcast. This might seem like a big ask, but remember that all of these influencers were once in your shoes and they know how valuable this type of publicity can be. Plenty of them will decline, but you may be surprised at how many will say yes.

At Certa Publishing, we are working hard to stay on top of the marketing trends so that our authors’ messages can reach as many people as possible. If all of this sounds a little overwhelming, please reach out. We offer comprehensive marketing services and would be glad to take the reigns of your marketing plan or simply help you get started. Contact us today.

 

5 Quick Holiday Marketing Ideas

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It’s not too late to do some quick holiday marketing! Here are five easy tips to get you selling more books this Christmas season:

1. Tailor your message to the timeframe

During the weeks leading up to Christmas

The time for persistent browsing and highly-personal shopping is over. It’s crunch time and everyone is just desperate to get a gift to their family or friends before the 25th. Through your newsletters and social media posts, direct consumers to your Amazon link. As it gets closer to Christmas, remind them that an ebook is available to gift immediately.

After Christmas

Many of your consumers likely unwrapped an Amazon gift card for Christmas. Although they might be thinking of buying tools or music, it’s your job to remind them that your book would be a great purchase. Schedule an email blast for the morning of December 26th with “redeem gift cards” and “Amazon” in the subject line.

At the New Year

Now is the time to develop a marketing pitch related to the New Year. Finance writers should focus on financial New Year resolutions. Health and fitness writers… well, you have it easy! Religious and self-help writers can easily craft a message as well. This would be a great time to write up a short 500-word blog post pulling out parts from your book that will inspire your readers to want more as they plan their 2019.

2. Send more emails than usual

Many consumers will go most of the year overlooking marketing emails and avoiding the “promotions” tab in Gmail. But during the holidays, those same buyers will intentionally search through their inbox looking for deals. So, go ahead and send more emails than usual. Be sure to run a promotion that can be easily summarized in your subject line. We suggest doubling the number of marketing emails from now until the first week of January.

3. Set the mood on social media

People want to feel “Christmasy” at this time of year. So set a festive mood on your social media accounts. Take photos of your book surrounded by Christmas lights or next to a cup of cocoa… even if it’s not a holiday-themed book.

Does your book contain anecdotes about the holidays? Financial tips for gift-giving? Holiday-themed nutrition ideas? Now is the time to highlight those portions on your feed.

4. Do a 12 Days of Christmas promotion

You may think it’s too late to run a promotion, but this one is simple to do. Choose a 12-day period in December. Ahead of time, tell your followers that you will be offering a different promotion each day. Then (this is key!) schedule your posts ahead of time. You’ll need one for each day. Here are some examples of promotions:

  • Buy one book, get one free
  • Percentage discount on different books for different days
  • Free shipping
  • Free upgrade to Priority or Overnight shipping as it gets closer to Christmas
  • Free gift wrapping
  • Bonus gift included, such as any personalized merchandise you have (pens, mugs, tote bags, etc)
  • 99 cent ebooks

Be sure to use a custom hashtag, such as #12daysof[booktitle], so your followers can follow the hashtag and receive reminders.

No matter the sales, this type of promotion really ramps up your name recognition in consumers minds. If they don’t purchase your book right away, they will be more likely to remember it when the need arises in the future.

5. Involve the reader

This is a great opportunity to ask your readers to post photos of themselves with your book.  A recent post on Author Marketing Experts offered this idea:

Involve people on a more personal level as their favorite author! Encourage these opportunities!

Do a call on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter and ask fans to share images of your book in their cozy holiday reading nooks, or your book with a backdrop of their fantastic tree.

Prepare to comment back because this is how these book marketing efforts make their biggest impact.

Simple, right? Even if you just pick one idea, you’ll see more clicks, traffic, and purchases. Although quick ideas like these can be very effective, at Certa Publishing we recommend a comprehensive marketing strategy that plans ahead for times like the holidays, and we have the resources and services to help you pull it off. Contact us when you’re ready to discuss a long-term marketing plan. We would love to partner with you.

Who are you on social media?

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As a writer, your presence on social media is key. If you’ve followed this blog for any length of time, you’ve seen us discuss follower counts, Twitter, platforms, and social media in depth. Today we’re looking at who you are on social media. You’re probably thinking, “Um, I’m me. Who else would I be? And why are you asking me to be someone I’m not?” Think of it more like a persona or a character.

Still not sure? We’re going to let Christy Huggins of Eventbrite explain in this excerpt of her recent post for Grammarly.

Refining your personality on social media can be a daunting process.

Individuals and brands get into trouble trying to create an entirely new personality on their social media accounts. Social should be a channel for you to deliver and develop a personality—but not to create an entirely new one. That can come off as forced and inauthentic.

If you’re writing social content on behalf of a company or brand, finetuning your personality is about writing copy that taps into your followers’ emotions.

That’s why we teamed up with Grammarly [on a] project where we unveiled five characters that accounts like yours should embody on social media. Find the one that most aligns with your personal or brand voice, and discover the emotions you can inspire.

Character #1: The Cool Curator

We all have that one friend who’s always in the know—the early adopter of new apps and the person we turn to when we need fresh music recommendations. Everyone wants to hang out with her. We want what she’s got.

The types of things your team will post:

  • Behind-the-scenes and in-the-know details
  • Artist or guest speaker sneak peeks
  • Breaking industry news

The emotion you’re going for:

  • Excitement, novelty

Newport Folk Festival is the oldest and most well-known folk festival in the U.S. The brand’s social media presence taps into its deep connections with folk superstars new and old.

Character #2: The Trusted Advisor

When you need advice, you know that this person has done his research, weighed the pros and cons, and possesses innate wisdom. He’s your “expert” friend, and you trust him implicitly.

As a brand, this persona is a thought leader of its genre. If you’re a rock music festival, you’re the rock music festival. Or if you’re a yoga and mindfulness brand, you know how to prove your mettle.

The types of things you’ll post:

  • Insight on a theme, not just about your event or product
  • Friendly advice from well-known personalities
  • “Did you know?” tips

The emotion you’re going for:

  • Confidence

The 3% Conference shares career inspiration, articles with expert guidance, and job opportunities on their Twitter page, which has nearly 20,000 followers.

Character #3: The Feel-Good Friend

Sometimes, we just want to hang out with someone goofy and low-pressure. This is our friend who sees the humor in every situation and is always up for fun just for the sake of it. If this is your persona, your posts will run the gamut from whimsical to humorous, and will typically use bright colors and short, quippy text.

The types of things you’ll post:

  • Colorful images
  • Whimsical captions
  • Funny GIFs
  • Cool memes
  • Inspirational quotes

The emotion you’re going for:

  • Happiness

National pop-up, The Museum of Ice Cream, consistently uses bright, ice-cream-worthy colors and whimsical themes in its social media posts. 

Character #4: The Tempter

The tempter knows the best bars and most picturesque hiking locations. Whether a foodie, a travel inspirer, or a fashionista, his posts always make you want to splurge on something.

The types of things you’ll post:

  • Gorgeous, high-quality shots of refreshments and libations
  • Images and video of attendees enjoying themselves
  • First looks at new vendors

The emotion you’re going for:

  • Desire

 

Eat Drink SF’s social media pages are visual feasts, showcasing the best of San Francisco eats year round — not just when the annual festival approaches. 

Character #5: The Innovator

Your innovator friend is often a tech visionary or an artist. Whatever medium they belong to, one thing is always for sure—they do things their own way.

As a social media persona, the Innovator finds new ways to post and share content. Posts are eye-catching, with a certain spark that makes you want to know more.

The types of things you’ll post:

  • Images and video from new angles
  • Videos capturing unusual situations
  • Think pieces and articles

The emotion you’re going for:

  • Curiosity

San Francisco Ballet is a legendary ballet company, and its social media presence is equally creative. Shots like this are made up of individual posts chopped into sections, then pieced back together in the profile like a visual puzzle.

See, we knew you would understand! So, as a writer, what will your online persona be? Often writers make fabulous “trusted advisors” on their particular topic. However, you could certainly use any of these characters as a voice for your social media brand.

At Certa Publishing we are constantly amazed by the creativity of our writers. But what if the creative marketing juices just aren’t flowing? We’re here for you! Contact us today to learn more about our marketing services, including full-service social media management.

Consistency: The key to building a platform

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You’ve heard it before. Before you can sell books, you need a platform. A fan base. A loyal following. But how exactly is this accomplished? Just by being awesome? If only it were that easy. Platforms are built just like anything—one piece at a time. Social media posts. Blogs posts. Email newsletters. But if you’re going to build sporadically, waiting for inspiration to strike, you will struggle to gain traction. Consistency is key. Here are three ways to use consistency to build your platform:

1. Be consistent in your branding

When you see those golden arches, you know it’s McDonald’s. No guessing required. Same with the Nike swoosh. Would your “brand” be quickly familiar to your audience? If not, you can change that today.

James McCrae offered this simple advice in his post for Forbes:

Your brand voice includes a visual presentation. Choose a distinct color palette, typography and logo. Have a professional headshot taken and use the same photo consistently across all touchpoints. Make it easy for your fans to recognize your brand from a mile away.

Look at this example from the team at Risen Motherhood.

Their Facebook page:

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Their Instagram account:

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Their website:

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What do you notice? There’s nothing fancy here, but there is consistency of colors, logo and style. Now it’s your turn. Go to your website, blog, author pages and each of your social media accounts. Is your “branding” consistent? If not, take the time to make that change.

2. Be consistent on your blog and social media

The days of posting online only when inspiration strikes are over. In order to build your platform and keep your audience engaged, you need to be consistent on your blog and social media. Are you saying I have to write or post something every day? I don’t have the time or even the ideas to do that. Take a deep breath. We recently profiled author Natalie Brenner who went from having a very small platform to being a bestselling author. She explains how she became more consistent:

I honed my voice and began writing more consistently on my website.

Creating a blog calendar to post at least once a week helped.

Just write — goal was to spend less than 90 minutes per post, publish, and share.

We always encourage our Certa authors to make the most of their content by leveraging it for social media posts. Your manuscript is likely full of quotes and scriptures that can be easily dropped onto an image and posted on social media. Graphic tools like Canva and social media managers like Buffer make it easier than ever to do so.

Quick-format social media also makes consistency easier. You can easily jump on Instagram stories each day to share an inspiring thought, poll your audience or share a photo related to your work. Twitter is also the perfect place for shooting out a quick thought, interesting link or question.

3. Consistently ask your audience to take action

Building a platform is much more than gaining Facebook likes. It involves converting the passive “scroller” to an active consumer of your writing, both paid and free. So how do you create this funnel? By consistently asking your audience to take action. Most writers do this by inviting their followers to join an email list. James McCrae offers this advice:

It’s important to know what action you want your audience to take and gear your efforts toward that conversion. Having a large email list is the metric that publishers value most. Email lists are weighed heavier than social media followers because email is a more stable communication platform. Having an email newsletter creates a deeper relationship with your audience and is less likely to be ignored than social posts. Platforms such as Mailchimp make it easy to build and manage an email list.

Of course, once you have an email list established, you have to send emails! Not sure what to include? Check out 20 Ideas for Your Author Newsletter Email, which includes some great ideas like:

  • Fun facts about your writing process
  • Blog posts from other blogs you admire
  • Book Signing and Event Dates

At Certa Publishing, we recognize that many of our authors lead very busy lives and find it difficult to be consistent in building a platform. We would love to help you in this area. We can help you create a social media calendar, manage your social media entirely or even provide ghostwriting for your blog. Contact us today to find out how we can help you.

Five Ways to Grow Your Platform

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If the thought of “building your fan base” or “growing your audience” overwhelms you, you’re certainly not alone. Creating an online platform isn’t a one click task, but there are ways to maneuver the often confusing road to successfully building your online reach.

The 5 major stages of the journey to grow your platform according to Michael Hyatt are as follows: Definition, Activation, Attraction, Monetization, and Optimization. If you’re tired of feeling like you’re writing to nobody and posting for no one to see but yourself, keep reading. I’ve adapted his 5 stages and action steps in order to best serve you, our Certa authors.


1. Definition – Gain clarity

As you work on finding your voice and creating a brand for yourself, you are considering the unique, God-given message you have to share. How will it impact the people that receive it? Determine exactly what your message is going to be.

Action steps:

  • Survey your readers
  • Write a core value proposition
  • Create a brand slogan
  • Develop your brand components (logo, photos, etc.)


2. Activation – Create content

Whether it’s a blog, vlog, podcast, or website, you’re launching your home base that will be the source of your main content. You’re beginning to work on gaining your first followers and learning how to serve them through great content in a consistent fashion.

Action steps:

  • Establish your home base
  • Select your primary content categories
  • Determine your voice
  • Commit to a publication schedule


3. Attraction – Attract customers

Your content is being created and published, but now you want to share it with as many people as you can. This is done by developing your social media presence (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, etc.), building an email list, and trying to increase your home base traffic.

Action steps:

  • Install an email collection form
  • Create a compelling email incentive
  • Choose a primary social media channel
  • Develop a social media strategy


4. Monetization – Generate cash

Once you have a solidified subscriber list and following, you want to serve them even better by increasing your income through online revenue. It’s time to explore affiliate links, selling ads, and creating original products (think eBooks, webinars, workbooks, conferences, etc.).

Action steps:

  • Understand your relationship to money
  • Consider advertising income
  • Maximize affiliate opportunities
  • Develop your own products


5. Optimization – Build a company

Finally freed from the demands of a day job, you can work on maximizing your impact and optimizing your results. By building infrastructure, developing workflows, and hiring a team, you can learn to empower others to spread the message that started this whole process.

Action steps:

  • Learn how to delegate
  • Establish a hiring process
  • Identify and define key workflows
  • Pay attention to the numbers

At Certa Publishing, we know that these steps can be intimidating, so we are here to guide and assist our authors. Contact us today!

Follower Count: How to Stop the Obsession – Part Two

Today we’re continuing our excerpt of social media consultant Andrea Dunlop’s article Stop Focusing on Follower Count: 5 Better Approaches for Improving Social Media Use . In our previous post, we highlighted her first two tips, which focused on market research and finding “influencers” in your field. Now onto her final three tips:

3. Network with other authors

Authors as a collective community are crucial to all of our careers. We need support when we’re starting out, and often, we rely on each other for things like blurbs, joint events, spreading the word, and even just support and commiseration in this difficult and often lonely business. It’s easy to reach out to fellow authors on social media: it doesn’t feel invasive, and lest you doubt the power of these connections, I will tell you that two of the guests at my wedding last August were fellow writers who I originally met via Twitter. It used to be that unless you lived in a big city, your opportunities for networking with authors and book folks was limited. Not so anymore. Use social media to support your fellow authors if you want them to do the same for you.

4. Create opportunities by just showing up

There is something I like to call the “serendipity effect” of being on social media. These are the difficult to quantify but very real opportunities created by being a regular contributor to the social sphere. Because I’m active on social media, I get many more opportunities than I would otherwise. Clients, speaking gigs, introductions to people who’ve made my professional and personal life better in myriad ways, have all come my way simply because I’m on social media and being myself. Being on these platforms makes me approachable. Likewise, when I’m looking for speakers for an event I’m working on, professionals to collaborate with, and authors to feature, social media is often my first stop.

5. Create fans and evangelists

Fancy tactics aside, I believe that the audience for a book is built reader by reader. Survey after survey shows that people mostly get book recommendations from their friends. So how do you make it happen? Here’s something I’ve observed in the year since my book has been on the market: the readers who I have some kind of meaningful interaction with on social media—for instance those who’ve been giveaway winners or even whose posts I’ve commented on—are much more likely to spread the word that they loved the book, post a review, etc., even if I don’t specifically ask them to do so.

When you’re wrapped up in the publishing world, it can be easy to forget what an accomplishment it is to be an author, and that it’s special to readers to hear from you personally. Many people on social media don’t live in New York or Seattle or any place they can go and see authors in person, so it’s meaningful to hear from someone whose work has moved them. And since connecting with readers is kind of the whole point of publishing books, it makes sense to use your social media as a natural extension of that work.

At Certa Publishing, we know that social media marketing can be intimidating and we are here to help! Let us know how we can assist you in any way.

Follower Count: How to Stop the Obesession

Within the space of ten years, a brand new metric for popularity and influence has been born: the follower count. Facebook followers. Twitter and Instagram followers. As a writer it’s easy to become obsessed with increasing our follower count, but social media consultant Andrea Dunlop offers a different perspective in her article Stop Focusing on Follower Count: 5 Better Approaches for Improving Social Media Use, which we have excerpted here:

As an author and social media marketer, I spend a lot of time thinking about the intersection of books and social media. I also know intimately the fatigue and overwhelm that comes from feeling like you have to be not only creating great work, but forever seeking new and ingenious ways to promote it. The quickest way to tire yourself out in this process is to set your eye on the wrong target, creating a Sisyphean struggle that is more likely to leave you feeling defeated than accomplishing even the most modest of marketing goals.

When I ask most clients what their goals are in hiring me, I usually get some version of “to get more followers and sell more books.” I encourage them to think both bigger and more deeply about social media. Here’s why: You know those folks you see on Twitter who have 20,000 followers, but are following 21,000 people? This is a perfect example of when follower count becomes absolutely meaningless as a metric. How could anyone have even the tiniest interactions with that many people on a regular basis? They can’t.

Numbers are helpful as a part of the picture; I’m all for tracking follow count, engagement, web traffic, conversions, Amazon ranking—these are all helpful indicators of progress. But becoming too obsessed with numbers ignores the social aspect of social media. Would you walk into a party with the sole mission of making twenty new friends? More likely, we go into social situations (even those specifically meant for networking) hoping to deepen our connections with our existing circle, meet some new and interesting people, learn some new things, and open the door to future opportunities and collaborations. Here’s how this translates to your strategic social media efforts as an author.

1. Conduct market research

In ye olden days before social media, more of marketing was guesswork. But now there’s so much data on who’s reading, buying, and talking about which books, it’s mind-boggling. Before your mind gets too boggled, here’s how to drill down and get some helpful insights:

  • Start with a list of ten or so books that fall into the category of what we industry types call “comp titles”—books that have a similar audience to yours.
  • Look up these titles on social media, as well as Amazon and Goodreads. This will give you a concrete idea of who your audience is and how they’re discussing the books, as well as what else they’re reading, and what else they’re interested in.
  • If you’re in the pitching stage, this can help you find and research agents and publishers (most of whom are active on social media).
  • Once your book is on sale, this can help you narrow your audience by looking at people who bought your books and seeing what else they bought, giving you real info on which books share an audience with yours: if you see several that pop up again and again, read them! It’s an amazing opportunity for insight into how readers are interpreting your books.

You have many more marketing tools at your disposal than authors in the past. Don’t overlook them.

2. Connect with influencers

You’ve probably heard of influencer marketing, but what is it and how can you use it? Influencer marketing sometimes refers to massive global brands paying thousands of dollars to an Instagram star with a million followers for product placement, but it can also work on a much smaller level. Many brands take advantage of the potential reach of bloggers, You Tubers, and podcasters who’ve built sizable followings, and authors should too.

First, let’s define an “influencer.” Really, it’s anyone on social media who has a following they’re regularly engaged with. One of the things I love about social media is that it makes “word of mouth” marketing—that much ballyhooed but often elusive magic—visible and quantifiable. You can see people getting excited about things their friends (or “friends”) love. Obviously, the bigger the person’s following—so long as it’s a truly engaged following—the more reach you’ll get, but don’t discount those who have a smaller but engaged audience. Check out places like the #bookstagram hashtag on Instagram to find a plethora of these folks. A word to the wise: These relationships are most meaningful when built over time, so be present by engaging (liking and commenting on posts), so that you’re not reaching out of the blue when you pitch them.

Check back soon for part two of this series as Ms. Dunlop discusses networking, increasing your social media activity and that old tried and true method of word-of-mouth marketing.

Announcing Your Book to the World!

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Congratulations!

Your book is in your hands; it is now easily seen on the Internet through your publisher’s website, Amazon.com, Google Book Preview, and – if you’ve gone the extra mile – your own website, blog, and social media sites.

Now your attention should shift to how to direct people to your book. How do you, without sounding like an obnoxious sales person, let all your family, friends, acquaintances and strangers know about your book? The two easiest, and free ways, are through the use of simple emails and social media.

Most people have at least 100 people in their email contact list. This is the perfect place to start. Take your time and construct a well-written email outlining what you have been working on, why you have written a book, your qualifications (if applicable) in the subject matter, brief book description with a strong hook, links to purchase your book, social media links and links to your video clips on YouTube. All your links can be in your signature as to not make your email too long. You have to be conscious that people have short attention spans.

The last thing, and possibly the most important request, to include in your email is an appeal for your contacts to forward your email along to their contacts. Let’s just say 50 of your contacts send it to their 100 contacts. Now instead of only reaching 100 people, you have reached 5,100! Now think of if just 100 of those 5,100 sent your email to their 100 contacts! Your total is now 15,100! As you can see, if your email is compelling enough, your exposure could explode with just a few emails!

This exponential growth found in the forwarding of your email can also be easily duplicated with social media. If you do not already have one, set up an author or book Facebook page (separate from your personal Facebook profile). Ask all your friends and contacts to find you on Facebook and friend your personal profile and like your book page. There are several other social media outlets that you would benefit from being a member; however, Facebook is currently the most important.

When creating or editing your author profile and book page, make sure you have an intriguing author bio, book description and links to all the places they can find your book. In your photos section, have a professional author photo as well as your front and back book covers.

Use the email you have already created as a Facebook post that all your friends can read and comment on. The reason this is important is because when they comment on it, all of their friends (that are not necessarily already your friends) will be able to see it. So once again, you see the potential for an explosion of growth by just doing one thing.

It is very easy to keep the flow of communication going with your friends on Facebook. You can post little quotes from your book, ask questions, discuss future books, go in depth (in short posts) about different subjects in your book, discuss some of the characters in your book, share links to your blog, and so much more.

As you can see, there are endless possibilities to promote your book that actually do not take a lot of time. I want to stress that these ideas can be used to begin the marketing of your book anytime from the writing process through having a published book in hand years later!

It’s never too late to start!